We are already in the first week of April and since breaking ground last week at the new site, half of the rubber trees have already been cut down. Throughout this progress we have discovered even more plants and trees, such as banana, mango and even the occasional jack-fruit tree.

Jack-fruit

We are exceptionally pleased with this discovery because the elephants will have a greater variety of food to enjoy whilst grazing. Some of the plants and trees will be relocated and replanted in other parts of the site for the benefit of the elephants. With half of the removal of rubber trees, the site has become open and it looks quite different, showing even more potential for the Home of Rest for Elephants (more about that soon!).

A local contractor has provided a construction excavator and a small team to help us clear the land. We have also started looking for a volunteer to help us examine the three man-made ponds at the site, to carry out a small survey to determine what species of animal may live in them.

Our immediate need will be to prevent erosion of the soil from the cleared land once the rainy season starts in May. This means planting trees and grass.

 

Can you buy a tree for us? For £25 you can have your own tree in your name or dedicated to a loved one. To plant a tree at Ban Ton Sae click here

Come back next week, to read another blog post on the new site’s progress!

 

 

The newly acquired 16 rai (6.5 acre) site at Ban Ton Sae was previously used as a rubber tree plantation, but it also has palms that are harvested for palm oil as well as natural durian and other fruit trees. There are three large man-made ponds at the site, which were used for irrigation and form a lovely feature of the surroundings. The site has challenging sloped land and quite undulating surfaces. There are only three areas on the site where the ground can be described as flat, which makes the planning process very interesting as we have to be creative with our ideas for the new terrain.

The planning for the site’s development is well underway and the start of the conversion process of the land has enabled it to become a suitable haven for elephants. People from the local community are being employed to cut down the rubber trees and remove them from the site. The timber will be sold to generate funds to help pay for the conversion of the land to a more ecofriendly system that will include planting the most appropriate flora for elephants to enjoy in a natural environment.

Here you can see photos of the new site just as we started to cut down the rubber trees in February 2018 – this is the first stage of recreating a perfect and ecofriendly environment for our future family of elephants. To help us, please click here.                                     

 

 

Southern Thailand Elephant Foundation (STEF) is delighted to announce the appointment as the charity’s Technical Advisor, of Lee Sambrook, one of the world’s leading elephant authorities.

Lee SambrookLee is very well known throughout the elephant world and has a lifetime’s experience working with elephants and other large mammals. He worked in two zoos before starting work at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) in the early 1980s. After seven years working with the elephants at London Zoo, he moved to Western Australia as Head Elephant Trainer at Perth Zoo, where he spent five years before returning to the UK as Team leader of Elephants at Whipsnade Zoo, where he had 11 Asian elephants under his care. He is particularly proud that ten elephant calves were born during his 21 years at ZSL. He is or has been a consultant for several zoos around the world.

Chairman of Trustees, Dr Andrew Higgins, said: “I have been fortunate to know Lee for several years and I am delighted that the Trustees have decided to appoint him as Technical Adviser. Lee’s advice, guidance and a lifetime’s experience will ensure all of our projects are undertaken with the best interests of the elephant in mind”.

Already Lee has spent several weeks at the new Ban Ton Sae site (pictured here with Jakrapob Thaotad, STEF Trustee and Project Manager) working hard to ensure the ground is cleared and prepared for the housing of elephants that are in need of care and retirement.

Southern Thailand Elephant Foundation (STEF) has launched a Sponsor a Tree appeal to encourage support in our work now underway to  restore the fragmented habitat at Ban Ton Sae so it can once again be safely managed for the care of elephants. Hundreds of rubber trees have removed and many palm oil trees and new grass is now growing on the old plantation site. With the coming of the rainy season in May we are hoping this will really bloom in the next few months and become lush green grazing. The new, natural forest trees will grow fast to provide shelter and shade for our elephant population, and to provide additional food sources for the Park’s natural bird and animal populations.

The project manager, and STEF Trustee, Jakrapob Thaotad, said “Ban Ton Sae promises to be an important biodiversity site yet the rubber trees and palm oil plantations over the years have led to it becoming degraded and fragmented with a sad loss of species diversity. We want to nurture our flora in a sensitive ecological way while providing an optimal environment for our elephants”.

Everyone who supports our Sponsor a Tree campaign will know that they are helping in this vital conservation work.Names of donors will be commemorated on a plaque. Just click on Contact Us to tell us the name of who is to be remembered, then after that, please donate £25 or more if you can by clicking here.